Parenting Children - August 17, 2012

Day 5 – Experiencing & Observing Healthy Relationships

Children learn to relate through experiencing, observing, and practicing various relationships within the family:
•  parent-child
•  mother-father
•  sibling-sibling
•  grandparent-grandchild
•  uncles, aunts, cousins, etc. Experiencing: parent-child relationship
•  children learn to love through experiencing their parents. unconditional love
•  important for children to feel accepted for who they are Our love and acceptance give our children confidence through building in them:
•  security (knowing they are loved not for what they do, but for who they are)
•  self-worth (knowing they are of value - their self-worth is based on what they think we, their parents, think of them)
•  significance (knowing there is a purpose to their lives, and that they have a worthwhile contribution to make) Ultimately security, self-worth and Significance come from God
•  we model God’s parenthood of us
•  parents are in loco dei (in His place to represent Him) Observing: mother-father (and other adult) relationships
•  children learn to relate through observing adult relationships
•  how we, their parents, speak and listen to each other
•  the physical affection we show
•  whether and how we resolve conflicts
•  children need to see firsthand the modeling of an intimate, committed adult relationship
•  if parenting together, consider doing The Marriage Course to invest in your relationship
•  if not parenting together, work at having thebest possible relationship with your child’s other parent (resolving conflict, forgiveness, consistency, etc.)

Question:
Where is your child learning most about how to build healthy relationships?

From Series: "Parenting Children Ages 0-10"

Study Guide

More From "Parenting Children Ages 0-10"

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  • our children crave to be noticed by us and crave our attention
  • special time with each child develops their self-esteem and their ability to relate to others
  • can be difficult for us as parents to recognize this need and to fulfill it
  • the more children we have, the more planning and conscious effort it takes
  • channels of communication are opened through spending one-on-one time with our child(ren)
  • can transform a child’s behavior
  • eye contact:
    • can be used either positively or negatively
    • children learn by modeling – if we do it, they’ll do it
    • easy when they are babies – but don’t give up eye contact as they get older
    • good eye contact goes hand in hand with active listening

Do you have fond memories of 1:1 time with a parent?  What memories can you create with your children one on one?

 

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